Ripper Street

Open, general discussion of classic sound-era films, personalities and history.
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missdupont

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Ripper Street

PostSun Jan 20, 2013 1:13 am

I just watched this mostly entertaining new series on BBC America called RIPPER STREET, a crime procedural set in London post-Jack the Ripper. Atmosphere and acting were top rate. This first episode's main clues revolved around photography and film, though they weren't actually using appropriate equipment for the era. Cameras were too small and the photographs were developed like regular prints from the 1920s-1990s, not like how prints would have been developed in 1889. There is film footage with a film camera using nitrate film, but isn't this too early for film? Of course, there are two nitrate fires in this, one where the cameraman sets the film on fire in the camera but then can't bear to see the camera go up in flames, so hugs it tightly. At least a nod to early filming and photography, even with details wrong.
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Penfold

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Re: Ripper Street

PostSun Jan 20, 2013 5:18 am

missdupont wrote:I just watched this mostly entertaining new series on BBC America called RIPPER STREET, a crime procedural set in London post-Jack the Ripper. Atmosphere and acting were top rate. This first episode's main clues revolved around photography and film, though they weren't actually using appropriate equipment for the era. Cameras were too small and the photographs were developed like regular prints from the 1920s-1990s, not like how prints would have been developed in 1889. There is film footage with a film camera using nitrate film, but isn't this too early for film? Of course, there are two nitrate fires in this, one where the cameraman sets the film on fire in the camera but then can't bear to see the camera go up in flames, so hugs it tightly. At least a nod to early filming and photography, even with details wrong.


I think the film camera is a good approximation of what an 1889/90 London experimenter might have come up with.....the first 70mm Kodak fim (for the Kodak #1 still camera) was just arriving from the US, and we do see 70mm film with a single home-produced perf. Some frames exist of Wordsworth Donisthorpe's 1890 film of Trafalgar Square; I don't believe Mr Donisthorpe put his camera to the use portrayed however, and the projector is about 5-6 years before the event, but there was no technical reason why, as in the story, one couldn't have been invented and then lost; it's fair use of dramatic license, I think.....plus, it's a great tale well told, but not, I would say, for the squeamish. We get episode four tonight.....Paul McGann is tunnelling for the Tube.
I could use some digital restoration myself...

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