Learning the Piano in Later Life

Open, general discussion of music during the era of classic/nitrate movies
  • Author
  • Message
Offline
User avatar

bobfells

  • Posts: 2012
  • Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 2:03 pm
  • Location: Old Virginny

Learning the Piano in Later Life

PostTue Dec 27, 2011 4:05 pm

I'm pleased to announce the publication of my new book in the first week of January. The topic was inspired by my own adventures in playing - or attempting to play - the piano in later life. The tone is light-hearted and chatty, but there's a lot of practical information on how anybody can achieve of modicum of success in learning to become a pianist.

This modest volume contains my various discoveries and observations on learning the piano in later life. Largely self-taught and with no special aptitude for music, I was motivated by my love of piano music and a sincere desire to play a number of works that I admired. I found some simple short cuts to master my favorite works of music, including the “secret” to learning new pieces easily, and how to develop confidence in teaching myself to become a pianist.

Your ultimate goal is to become an independent pianist, not tethered to exercise books or grade level-type of instruction books. You play what you like and like what you play. Best of all, your mind will thank you for it. At any rate, these are the factors that inspired me to write MEMOIRS OF A SECRET PIANIST:
Image

The book will be available on Amazon.com (both paperback and Kindle edition) and there's a good chance that Barnes & Noble will also pick it up since they are now selling some of my other books.
Offline

Midge

  • Posts: 19
  • Joined: Sat Aug 01, 2009 12:51 am
  • Location: San Francisco

Re: Learning the Piano in Later Life

PostSat Jan 28, 2012 1:24 am

Bob, your book is of great interest to me because I always longed to have piano lessons as a child and never got to have them. I'm 63 now and have myself convinced that there would be no point in trying to learn at my age -- my fingers aren't agile enough, old dogs can't learn new tricks, I haven't got enough talent, etc. etc. You know, all the usual excuses. Maybe your story will be just the inspiration I need! I've just ordered a copy on Amazon. :)
Offline
User avatar

bobfells

  • Posts: 2012
  • Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 2:03 pm
  • Location: Old Virginny

Re: Learning the Piano in Later Life

PostSat Jan 28, 2012 6:25 am

Midge, please let me know what you think of the book.Don't worry about your fingers, learn piano to benefit your mind.The other night I played a lovely Chopin Nocturne. Listening to myself objectively I thought, "Boy that was lousy." But I enjoyed working my way through it and my dog appreciated it!
Offline

Midge

  • Posts: 19
  • Joined: Sat Aug 01, 2009 12:51 am
  • Location: San Francisco

Re: Learning the Piano in Later Life

PostSat Jan 28, 2012 6:24 pm

Bob, I will be glad to offer a capsule review both here and on Amazon. I think you've made a very good point that technical excellence is not as important at this stage in our lives as the personal satisfaction that comes from doing something that we love to do. Electronic keyboards nowadays have headphone jacks, so bothering the other people in the household with amateur mistakes doesn't need to be an issue, either. I'm very impressed that you can play Chopin anything at any level of competence! I never got past "Chopsticks," though I do read music and I have played the bassoon (badly!) and soprano recorder.

Return to Music of the Era

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests