Whither "The Great Gatsby" (1926)?

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Mazamette

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Whither "The Great Gatsby" (1926)?

PostFri Nov 12, 2010 8:11 pm

Somehow the 1926 The Great Gatsby has come up a couple times in my reading lately.

Herbert Brenon directed it, Lasky and Zukor produced it, and it stars Warner Baxter (somebody I really like) as Gatsby, Lois Wilson (ditto) as Daisy Buchanan, Neil Hamilton as Nick Carraway, William Powell (somebody I love) as George Wilson, and Georgia Hale as Myrtle Wilson, all in a get-it-while-it's-hot film version of a recent bestselling novel that defined the mood and spirit of the '20s for the next few generations. What's not to WANT?

Has anyone here seen it? Is it available anywhere? Oh, don't tell me it's lost. Unless it is, of course.
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Re: Whither "The Great Gatsby" (1926)?

PostFri Nov 12, 2010 8:21 pm

Mazamette wrote:Oh, don't tell me it's lost. Unless it is, of course.


Unfortunately....you guessed it.
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PostFri Nov 12, 2010 8:29 pm

[whimper]...Hello, Gosfilmofond? I was wondering if...Could you check your archives?...
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westegg

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PostFri Nov 12, 2010 8:44 pm

A one minute trailer exists of the film, with a few tantalizing glimpses.
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Harold Aherne

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PostFri Nov 12, 2010 8:58 pm

You can see a few seconds of the '26 Gatsby in the film's trailer, which has survived and appears in the "More Treasures from American Film Archives" collection.

What would be especially worthwhile about the silent Gatsby is that it wouldn't be hobbled by the nostalgia that later adaptations get drowned in--the director, actors and set designers get so caught up in recreating the 20s that they lose sight of Fitzgerald's actual message. And handling Nick is always problematic; so much of the novel depends on his interior insights that are difficult to include in a film without relying too much on narration (another complaint I have with the '74 version).

I've seen portions of the '49 Gatsby (it was formerly posted on--ahem--a well-known video site) and wasn't overly impressed with it either. Some bizarre changes were made, including having Nick and Jordan marry and inserting a more didactic, moralistic tone towards Gatsby, probably to appease the PCA. (The AFI catalogue has an account of all the fussing Joseph Breen did over Paramount's scripts, and just at the time the novel was becoming a certified classic.)

Another Fitzgerald adaptation from the silent era, Warners' The Beautiful and Damned from 1922, also seems to be lost. Some of his short stories were also adapted at the time, The Chorus Girl's Romance ("Head and Shoulders") and The Off-Shore Pirate with Viola Dana in 1920 and '21 respectively, and also The Husband Hunter ("Myra Meets His Family") with Eileen Percy in 1920. Don't know if any of these survive, however.

-Harold
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Mazamette

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PostFri Nov 12, 2010 9:34 pm

Harold, this is exactly what makes me want badly to see it:
What would be especially worthwhile about the silent Gatsby is that it wouldn't be hobbled by the nostalgia that later adaptations get drowned in--the director, actors and set designers get so caught up in recreating the 20s that they lose sight of Fitzgerald's actual message.


It must have been a defining moment in the popular culture of the day, maybe similar in a way to how It defined Elinor Glyn's concept of the mood of the mid-twenties. The influence of this film must have been big -- certainly it's the book that's made the Gatsby story such an iconic insight into the twenties, but I can only imagine
that the film must have augmented the book's reputation.

Unless it was a total dud. Which, considering the cast and crew, is hard to imagine.

Does anybody know anything about the box-office figures at the time, or can you point me to some contemporary reviews?

What a loss.
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Harold Aherne

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PostFri Nov 12, 2010 9:55 pm

Mazamette wrote:It must have been a defining moment in the popular culture of the day, maybe similar in a way to how It defined Elinor Glyn's concept of the mood of the mid-twenties. The influence of this film must have been big -- certainly it's the book that's made the Gatsby story such an iconic insight into the twenties, but I can only imagine that the film must have augmented the book's reputation.


I remember reading--perhaps in one of Matthew Bruccoli's works--words to the effect that Fitzgerald was pleased with the film version of Gatsby. It had also been a moderately successful Broadway play adapted by Owen Wilson, running at the Ambassador Theatre from February to May 1926 with James Rennie and Florence Eldridge as Jay and Daisy.

Bruccoli noted that unsold first edition copies of Gatsby were still in the Scribner warehouse into the 1940s, and the consensus among Fitzgerald scholars seems to be that Gatsby was less successful than This Side of Paradise, which in many ways helped to define perceptions of the younger generation in the early 20s--although interestingly enough, it's the only one of FSF's five novels that has never been filmed. I could readily picture Wallace Reid as Amory Blaine. Had he lived, he might have even made a good Gatsby.

-Harold
Last edited by Harold Aherne on Fri Nov 12, 2010 11:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Rodney

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PostFri Nov 12, 2010 10:46 pm

Harold Aherne wrote:What would be especially worthwhile about the silent Gatsby is that it wouldn't be hobbled by the nostalgia that later adaptations get drowned in--the director, actors and set designers get so caught up in recreating the 20s that they lose sight of Fitzgerald's actual message.


Yes, this is precisely one of the most charming things about the silent Chicago. It's not nostalgic, it's a bit disgusted and pissed off. So I also would love to see the silent Gatsby (those are some of my favorite actors and actresses too).

A promotional page for Gatsby appeared in my calendar dedicated to lost films a year ago.
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PostFri Nov 12, 2010 11:23 pm

Harold Aherne wrote:I've seen portions of the '49 Gatsby (it was formerly posted on--ahem--a well-known video site) and wasn't overly impressed with it either. Some bizarre changes were made, including having Nick and Jordan marry and inserting a more didactic, moralistic tone towards Gatsby, probably to appease the PCA. (The AFI catalogue has an account of all the fussing Joseph Breen did over Paramount's scripts, and just at the time the novel was becoming a certified classic.)


`Didactic, moralistic tone' - got it in one. It's very disappointing. Starts with one of those typically 40s framing sequences (spoilers for those who have not read the book - and if not, why not?) - `Why, here's a grave! Why, it's Jay Gatsby's grave! Why, who was Jay Gatsby and how did he die? Why, I'll tell you!'

The twenties just didn't seem to gel with the late 40s and early 50s. Maybe contemplating such a frivolous time would feel a little obscene in the aftermath of WWII, but the only films I've seen from that time that go close to doing service to the era are `Some Like It Hot' and `Singin' In The Rain'.

Mazamette wrote:It must have been a defining moment in the popular culture of the day, maybe similar in a way to how It defined Elinor Glyn's concept of the mood of the mid-twenties. The influence of this film must have been big -- certainly it's the book that's made the Gatsby story such an iconic insight into the twenties, but I can only imagine that the film must have augmented the book's reputation. .


It was really only after Fitzgerald's death that `The Great Gatsby' came to be seen as the quintessential novel of the jazz age. When it was first released it sold relatively poorly and although it got good reviews, it was not seen as especially influential. This really devastated Fitzgerald.

To be honest, I don't imagine the film made all that big of a splash at the time of its release. The bare bones of the story aren't so very different from many jazz age dramas from around that time. Like Rodney, the 1927 `Chicago' is the first film that I thought of in comparison. We have a certain view of it from the distance of 80 years and several adaptative mutations; the contemporary view would have been quite different.

Mordaunt Hall's is the only review I've ever seen (it's available online), and he seems to have regarded it as solid entertainment but nothing to set the world alight. I think that's probably accurate.

All of this makes it something that would be even more fascinating to see - Gatsby without the mythology of Gatsby weighing down on it, as Harold says.
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PostSat Nov 13, 2010 8:54 am

Here's Frederick James Smith's review of THE GREAT GATSBY from the January 15, 1927 issue of Liberty:

F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby presented numerous difficulties. The mad Princetonian wrote of a soldier who, given wings by the magic uniform of war, wins the love of a rich Southern girl. She marries another, while he comes out of the war to fight his way to the top unscrupulously and relentlessly. In the end the Great Gatsby topples and the woman is left to work out a measure of happiness with her philandering husband.

Getting this story through the censor sieve will be no mean task. The film version holds fairly true to the original ironic story of unrestrained ambitions and untrammeled passions.

THE GREAT GATSBY is interest-holding -- but its chief sensation is provided by Lois Wilson. You have seen Miss Wilson play many a goody-goody heroine -- the girl usually beloved by the honest cowboy of NORTH OF 36, THE THUNDERING HERD, and a host of other films.

She has been threatening a revolution. For months she has said that she wanted to play the sort of girl the boys in front of the screen remember. She gets her wish as Daisy Buchanan in THE GREAT GATSBY. Lois flashes silken hose to the knees, gets potted on cocktails, and wanders through the story with a contemplative eye upon matrimonial indiscretions. You are in for a shock.
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PostSat Nov 13, 2010 9:52 am

All of this makes it something that would be even more fascinating to see - Gatsby without the mythology of Gatsby weighing down on it, as Harold says.


Hmmm. This thread's been very interesting to me, as it seems that my expectations about both the film and the book started with a heavy dose of the "mythology of Gatsby" colored by my own experience of growing up with the belief that the book had been a quintessential runaway hit when first published, and the film would have been likewise a huge event. I guess it wasn't so.

Still, while it's not possible to speak to the quality of a film that's lost, the cast and crew involved make it seem likely that it must have been rather good -- maybe the moreso if we were able to view it from the perspective of decades. I guess we can all agree that no matter what its reception was back in the 20's, it's a significant loss if only because of the story's place in the American canon. I hope it turns up someday.
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PostTue Nov 16, 2010 5:35 pm

On a somewhat related note - anyone got an opinion on Baz Luhrmann's plans to shoot `The Great Gatsby' with Carey Mulligan as Daisy, Leonardo di Caprio as Gatsby, and Tobey Maguire as Nick Carraway? Intriguing casting.

On balance, Luhrmann is better with visuals than with emotive storytelling (`Romeo and Juliet' aside, but that's a story with 400 years' worth of road testing behind it), so I hope it doesn't end up the cinematic equivalent of a beautiful little fool.
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PostTue Nov 16, 2010 8:15 pm

No opinion but, given my ID on this forum, it's obvious I'm a fan of the novel--and of the 1974 film version, which really had a big impact on me when I was eighteen during the year of its release. There was a 2000 TV version I have a copy of but haven't looked at (it was panned worse than the '74 version). I think there were many good things in the '74 film, particularly Sam Waterston as Nick. I'd prefer Rachel McAdams in the role of Daisy, though. Leo seems as good a choice as any as Gats himself.

:)
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The Great Gatsby

PostTue Nov 16, 2010 8:25 pm

I liked Carey Mulligan in An Education and I think she's a good choice to play Daisy. We'll see about Leonardo, I guess. That role tends to defeat the best intentions. Robert Redford was a blank slate in a film over-stuffed with period decor, while the problem with the Alan Ladd version was that they tried to "explain" Gatsby with too much back-story. Plus, I can't say I ever found Alan Ladd a very compelling presence anyhow.

Getting back to the lost silent version: yesterday I looked at the film's clipping file at the Performing Arts Library at Lincoln Center, but there wasn't much there. I found two contemporary reviews, but both were brief and superficial. The anonymous critic from the New Jersey Telegraph didn't much like the movie but couldn't convey why. Here are some extracts:

The stage play was voted a success. The photoplay will attain a degree of approbation. But some how to me “The Great Gatsby” doesn’t click. Here is a mighty fine story concerning the lives of some very human beings. The character of Gatsby should have and hold audience sympathy throughout the action. But in the hands of Warner Baxter it fails to do so. The tragedies that enter the lives of these people should elicit a tear. But, as enacted, nary a tear is spilled.

This is followed by a lengthy synopsis, and then the critic writes:

There is fine material. The futility of Gatsby's effort, the emotional conflict raging in Daisy's soul, the reformation of the erring husband, the insane revenge of the half-mad mechanic for his weak wife's death--all this is substantial fare. But in the screen version the cast does not serve it well. This is with the exceptions of Lois Wilson and William Powell.

Powell easily takes first honors, while Lois has moments that are really big. There are several bathing girl sequences, depicting the wild parties that Gatsby gives, although he is always an absentee host. The sets throughout are very fine. The production has everything, it would seem. Yet it doesn't ring true. Jane Jennings, in a dowager role, contributes some good bits in an abbreviated part. I wonder what Neil Hamilton, who now plays the part of an onlooker, would have done with the name part?


That's from the N.J. Telegraph of Nov. 22, 1926. I wish the critic had gone into more detail about what was actually on the screen. No, what I really wish is that someone could find a print of this movie!
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PostTue Nov 16, 2010 11:36 pm

Every reviewer I've read makes it quite explicit that they consider the stage play and not the book to be the film's basis, so that would be a good place to go to get an idea of what was included.

From Mordaunt Hall's New York Times review there are a few more details:

The screen version of "The Great Gatsby" is quite a good entertainment, but at the same time it is obvious that it would have benefited by more imaginative direction. Although Mr. Brenon has included the tragic note at the end, he has succumbed to a number of ordinary movie flashes without inculcating much in the way of subtlety. Neither he nor the players have succeeded in fully developing the characters.

Warner Baxter fills the rôle of Jay Gatsby and Lois Wilson plays Daisy Buchanan. They both give conscientious performances but are handicapped by the incidental movie intrusions. Daisy is seen in one episode assuaging her disappointment in life by drinking absinthe. She takes enough of this beverage to render the average person unconscious. Yet she appears only mildly intoxicated, and soon recovers.

Cocktails are an important feature in this picture, after Gatsby returns from the war. Mr. Brenon makes the most of these insidious stimulants, and even has the girls in a swimming pool snatching at cocktails, while they are swimming.

To give the impression or Gatsby's recklessness with money there is a sequence in which this man of sudden means tosses twenty-dollar gold pieces into the water, and you see a number of the girls diving for the coins.

A clever bit of comedy is introduced by a girl asking what Gatsby is throwing into the water, and as soon as this creature hears that they are real gold pieces she unhesitatingly plunges into the pool to get a share.


I wonder if this was the film's version of the famous coloured shirts scene in the book? I have not seen the 1926 trailer, but apparently that's one of the scenes that appears in it.
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PostTue Nov 16, 2010 11:51 pm

On a somewhat related note - anyone got an opinion on Baz Luhrmann's plans to shoot `The Great Gatsby' with Carey Mulligan as Daisy, Leonardo di Caprio as Gatsby, and Tobey Maguire as Nick Carraway? Intriguing casting
.

I hear Luhrmann was unhappy his rather lugubrious Moulin Rouge and hopes to bring 'Great Gatsby' up to the 21st century, with a faster pace and quicker cuts.
"You can't top pigs with pigs."

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PostWed Nov 17, 2010 12:05 am

:? I hate all these idiotic rapid cuts. They don't make for a better movie. They just make for a bad headache! That's all we need.

:( Thanks for posting all these great vintage reviews.I read on another board just a few weeks ago that GATSBY was rumored to exist in a Eastern European archive back in the early part of the last decade. Anyone have additional information on this rumor?
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Re: Whither "The Great Gatsby" (1926)?

PostWed Nov 17, 2010 7:25 am

Mazamette wrote:Somehow the 1926 The Great Gatsby has come up a couple times in my reading lately.

Herbert Brenon directed it, Lasky and Zukor produced it, and it stars Warner Baxter (somebody I really like) as Gatsby, Lois Wilson (ditto) as Daisy Buchanan, Neil Hamilton as Nick Carraway, William Powell (somebody I love) as George Wilson, and Georgia Hale as Myrtle Wilson, all in a get-it-while-it's-hot film version of a recent bestselling novel that defined the mood and spirit of the '20s for the next few generations. What's not to WANT?

Has anyone here seen it? Is it available anywhere? Oh, don't tell me it's lost. Unless it is, of course.


sounds like you have no love for Neil "Commisioner Gordon" Hamilton :o :wink:
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PostWed Nov 17, 2010 9:36 am

Hey! I do so have love for Neil Hamilton, though I guess I missed his turn as Commissioner Gordon. Got love for Georgia Hale, too, just to go on record wid it. I even love Mordaunt Hall (sometimes) and the cocktails he invokes. I love seeing cocktails in Prohibition-era movies. Must have driven people nuts. In fact, I love cocktails in general. :D

Baz Lurhmann and his talking pictures, though? Not so much. I mean seriously, who the hell wants to hear actors talk?

Great to read the contemporary reviews of Gatsby here -- they really correct my misimpression that the film must have been an unqualified blockbuster, which was in itself based on my misimpression that the book itself had been huge from the get-go.
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PostWed Nov 17, 2010 10:05 am

The way I feel about another movie of The Great Gatsby is...

good thing they're wasting their time on a great book that has never made a good movie, rather than wasting their time trashing the memory of a great book that actually made a great movie, like Double Indemnity.
If you truly love film, I think the healthiest thing to do is not read books on the subject. I prefer the glossy film magazines with their big colour photos and gossip columns, or the National Enquirer. Such vulgarity is healthy and safe. —Werner Herzog
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PostSun Nov 28, 2010 6:24 pm

This is rather a late reply but I thought people might be interested in seeing a color version of the herald Rodney wrote of, along with excerpts from couple of additional reviews. The Variety review is generally positive, the Moving Picture World one less so.

Image

From the Variety review:
Abel. wrote:The Picture is no reflection on the original novel, an excellent volume, which, because of its literary form, permits a more faithful adherence to reality than the movies. As a general entity the screen version of "The Great Gatsby" is good stuff. Fitzgerald will certainly have no quarrel with the filmization of his novel. ... The casting is excellent as far as the cast's personations of their roles are concerned. Baxter as Gatsby leaves nothing wanting. Neil Hamilton ... has an easy time of it. Lois Wilson and Hale Hamilton are the uncertainties. Miss Wilson did her role too faithfully, it seems. After all, she is what parallels the "heroine" of a screen story and she might have softened it up in general. With the trueness of her personation there is naught to be found, but for the paradoxical criticism it is too well done. Ditto for Hale Hamilton.

From the Moving Picture World review:
Epes W. Sargent wrote:Several times this season Paramount has presented some picture with an extraordinarily good cast, but no production as excelled in acting value the work of the first six players in "The Great Gatsby" ... From this angle "The Great Gatsby" is one of the notable pictures of the season, but the scenarist has failed utterly to give the players real personality. Only the shell is transferred to the screen. None of the psychology of Gatsby's character, which is the reason for the story, is transferred to the screen. He might as well be a dramatized tailor's dummy for all the interest he arouses, yet Gatsby was a singularly interesting study of a post-war product and Warner Baxter plays with a sureness and finish that almost redeems the part. Lois Wilson, too, is powerful in moments which are theatric rather than dramatic, and William Powell, in a minor role, is uncanny in his realism ... The picture is too shallow and insincere to be great, but it is interesting pictorially.
- Derek B.
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The Great Gatsby

PostSun Nov 28, 2010 7:52 pm

Thanks for posting more review excerpts and that color ad, which gives us a sense of how the actors looked in the film. I like that JG monogram on Warner Baxter's jacket.

I mentioned earlier in the thread that I looked up The Great Gatsby in the Performing Arts Library clippings file, and quoted from one of the reviews I found there, but neglected to mention that I also found a full-page ad torn out of an unidentified trade magazine. (Unfortunately I'm not able to provide a scan.) What's interesting about it is Warner Baxter's appearance, which is not at all the way we imagine Jay Gatsby. Because the story is set during a summer heat wave the characters all wear summer togs, but in this photo Baxter is in full evening wear complete with a silk topper. He looks like he's playing Dr. Jekyll and he's got a glint in his eye, like he's about to drink the potion . . .
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Re: Whither "The Great Gatsby" (1926)?

PostFri Aug 26, 2011 6:29 pm

Just came across this advertisement in a rural Australian newspaper from August 1927:

Image

No reference whatsoever to F. Scott Fitzgerald!
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Re: Whither "The Great Gatsby" (1926)?

PostMon Oct 24, 2011 2:13 pm

I hope to be forgiven for resurrecting this thread but I just finished reading the novel for the second time today. I've only seen the Redford/Farrow version of the film and I saw it many years ago as a youngster, not having read the book at all.
Having now read it twice and fallen in love with it as a piece of literature I find it hard to imagine any film version doing it justice.
It's almost as if the characters belong only in that novel and should not be given faces other than in our individual imaginations.
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Re: Whither "The Great Gatsby" (1926)?

PostThu Oct 27, 2011 9:15 pm

I have the 1949 version with Alan Ladd as Gatsby. Its a perfect casting & all in all a fine adaptation. Just there is a cut at the end when Gatsby is shot. Macdonald Carey, Barry Sullivan, Shelly Winters, Ed Begley, Elisha Cook Jr., Ruth Hussey. The cream of the crop for that year.
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Re: Whither "The Great Gatsby" (1926)?

PostFri Oct 28, 2011 2:15 am

Ya see...straight away, Ladd sounds wrong. He's too small to be a Gatsby.

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