Seattle Times: Paramount replaces longtime silent-film orga

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Seattle Times: Paramount replaces longtime silent-film orga

Unread post by silentfilm » Tue Jun 30, 2009 9:57 pm

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/l ... nt29m.html


Paramount replaces longtime silent-film organist

Dennis James, longtime organist for the Paramount Theatre's popular Silent Movie Mondays series, was replaced recently by Seattle Theatre Group, and it's unclear exactly why.

By Moira Macdonald

Seattle Times movie critic

Moviegoers attending the Paramount Theatre's popular Silent Movie Mondays series were startled last week: Dennis James, the organist for the series since its inception in 1998, was not in his usual seat at the Mighty Wurlitzer.

Instead, he was outside the theater. "I showed up," he said, "and indeed they had hired another organist to perform."

On June 19, Seattle Theatre Group (or STG, which operates the Paramount) issued a news release saying that Oakland-based organist Jim Riggs would accompany the then-remaining two films in the series. No explanation was given for the change. STG also canceled a fundraising concert planned for June 28, to benefit the ongoing restoration of the Paramount organ, at which James had been scheduled to perform.

Josh LaBelle, executive director of STG, declined to comment on the decision to replace James for the remainder of the series. "As a matter of policy, our organization does not publicly discuss artist contracts and negotiations," he said. He added that the Paramount "has nothing but extraordinary respect for Dennis, for his work as an artist."

Meanwhile, James points to an e-mail he says he received from a Paramount staffer on June 19 that advises him that he is "persona non grata" at the theater. Asked specifically about the phrase, LaBelle reiterated that he was unable to comment.

James described the situation as "just a mystery." He said that STG, via e-mail, bought out his contract for the summer series earlier this month.

His relationship with the theater hit turbulence early this year, he said, during talks for the 2009-10 season. He said that in February, he received an e-mail informing him that the Paramount was placing him "on hiatus."

"No explanation ... they [just] thanked me for 11 years of service," James said. He mentioned "various situational difficulties, connected with having amateurs do the professional work" to maintain and restore the theater organ, but said he had discussed these with management and was thanked for bringing the matters to their attention.

"We've worked these things through," he said.

Tom Blackwell, crew chief for the volunteer Puget Sound Theater Organ Society crew that takes care of the instrument, said, "He's very demanding, there's no doubt about that.

"[But] he's really great at what he does. We try to jump on everything that he needs to be able to put on the best possible performance."

One of the country's leading practitioners of silent-movie accompaniment, James maintains a busy schedule at theaters nationwide, including an engagement this spring at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.

For patrons of Silent Movie Mondays, the news of his departure came as a shock. Patrick Alexander, of Bellevue, who with his wife, Lori, has been attending Silent Movie Mondays for "about four years," said he'd heard rumors flying after the second performance in the series June 12 about James being released from his position. After that show, he talked to James, who said that he had not been contracted for next season.

Distressed, Alexander organized a protest for the June 19 performance, carrying a sign and passing out fliers urging the Paramount to retain James.

Alexander, himself a musician, described James' performances over the years as "phenomenal. As an organist, he's just amazing. Watching him play, that's half of the enjoyment of the film."

Lisa Glomb, of Seattle, a frequent Silent Movie Mondays attendee for the past three years, echoed those thoughts. Riggs, she said, was "very good, but he just did not have the panache and brio that Dennis James brings to it. He [James] just lives and breathes that Wurlitzer."

Silent Movie Mondays, now in its 12th season, has featured dozens of films, ranging from well-known works to rarities such as this month's "The Godless Girl." James has been the featured organist every season.

Paramount public-relations manager Amanda Bedell said the attendance is consistently around 300 patrons per performance, though the popular Charlie Chaplin or Douglas Fairbanks offerings can attract more than three times that number.

"The silent films are one of the few places that you see people who are 82 bringing their grandchildren and great-grandchildren, and everybody has a great time," Glomb said. "They're extremely well attended, and it's a really wonderful community experience."

James said that he hopes for an outcome that would be "the continuance of our series as it's been going on for 11 years, and to which everyone has agreed."

LaBelle, though he did not comment on the future of the theater's relationship with James, said that "of course" it had not ruled out the possibility of seeing James at the organ again. "I just personally think he's one of the greatest organists I've ever heard," he said.

Moira Macdonald: 206-464-2725 or mmacdonald(at)seattletimes.com

Copyright © 2009 The Seattle Times Company

For more on this, check out the comments, some not so friendly, and some by Dennis himself, at http://community.seattletimes.nwsource. ... 2009396053

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Unread post by WaverBoy » Wed Jul 01, 2009 10:11 am

Cool, I scooped the Seattle Times!

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Unread post by Chris Snowden » Wed Jul 01, 2009 10:43 am

Dennis James may have burned a few bridges over the years, but in my opinion he's the greatest organ accompanist alive, possibly the greatest there's ever been or will be.

I've heard Gaylord Carter, Clark Wilson, Jim Riggs and others (Bob Vaughn will always be a sentimental favorite of mine). They were all first-rate. But Dennis is the king.
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Unread post by rudyfan » Wed Jul 01, 2009 12:51 pm

Chris Snowden wrote:Dennis James may have burned a few bridges over the years, but in my opinion he's the greatest organ accompanist alive, possibly the greatest there's ever been or will be.

I've heard Gaylord Carter, Clark Wilson, Jim Riggs and others (Bob Vaughn will always be a sentimental favorite of mine). They were all first-rate. But Dennis is the king.
I have to agree with Chris, here. I did not have the pleasure of hearing Gaylord Carter. I'd add the 95+ noodler Bob Mitchell, too.

Dennis James brings great musicality and style and panache to the screenings. It makes me look forward to the SF Silent Film Fest all the more. Every film he has played has knocked my socks off. This is a shame, but if it means he is free to play in the Bay Area more often, I am all for it.
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Unread post by Frederica » Wed Jul 01, 2009 1:43 pm

rudyfan wrote: Dennis James brings great musicality and style and panache to the screenings. It makes me look forward to the SF Silent Film Fest all the more. Every film he has played has knocked my socks off. This is a shame, but if it means he is free to play in the Bay Area more often, I am all for it.
I'm with Donna, looking for my socks. No disrespect to the other fine organists playing for silents, but James can really bring the house down.

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Unread post by Richard M Roberts » Wed Jul 01, 2009 2:15 pm

[quote="Chris Snowden"]Dennis James may have burned a few bridges over the years, but in my opinion he's the greatest organ accompanist alive, possibly the greatest there's ever been or will be.


Then you've never heard Phil Carli play the organ, and he does it without the sheet music in front of him.

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Unread post by rudyfan » Wed Jul 01, 2009 3:50 pm

Richard M Roberts wrote:
Chris Snowden wrote:Dennis James may have burned a few bridges over the years, but in my opinion he's the greatest organ accompanist alive, possibly the greatest there's ever been or will be.


Then you've never heard Phil Carli play the organ, and he does it without the sheet music in front of him.

RICHARD M ROBERTS
I've heard Dr. Carli on the piano only. And this has always been a pure pleasure. I'd love to hear him on the mighty Wurlitzer, hello SF Silent Fest! No disresprect intended.

I don't care if James plays with sheet music, he can grandstand all he wants, when he plays a film (at least every time I've been) the audience is fully into the experience and raises cheers and shouts at the end. It's the end result, a fully satisfying cinematic experience, he's never let me down.
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Unread post by Chris Snowden » Wed Jul 01, 2009 5:05 pm

Richard M Roberts wrote:Then you've never heard Phil Carli play the organ, and he does it without the sheet music in front of him.
I haven't, and I'm sure he's terrific at it. I think Phil is the greatest of the piano accompanists.

But I give Dennis James bonus points because he's got that sheet music in front of him. He doesn't just improvise great music, he hunts down the original scores, even if only fragments survive, and he incorporates them into his performances whenever possible. Nobody else does this as consistently as Dennis does, and that commitment to authenticity puts him in a class apart.

At the same time, he has the flexibility to perform scores that are only partly traditional, like the one I saw him do for Faust in which his organ score was complimented by somebody on a theremin. It worked magnificently, and I'm as into traditional silent film scores as anybody.

I've never heard a Dennis James score that wasn't outstanding. I can't say that about anyone else but Clark Wilson, but I've only heard Clark once or twice and I've heard Dennis for over a decade.
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And now a brief commercial message

Unread post by DShepFilm » Wed Jul 01, 2009 10:25 pm

Dennis James accompanies THE YANKEE CLIPPER (81 minutes, 1925) and a 10-minute excerpt from DOWN TO THE SEA IN SHIPS (1922) on the Seattle Paramount's original-installation Wurlitzer pipe organ. These films (and 3 others) are on the Flicker Alley DVD called UNDER FULL SAIL This is Dennis' solo DVD debut.

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Unread post by Richard M Roberts » Thu Jul 02, 2009 2:02 am

rudyfan wrote:
Richard M Roberts wrote:
Chris Snowden wrote:Dennis James may have burned a few bridges over the years, but in my opinion he's the greatest organ accompanist alive, possibly the greatest there's ever been or will be.


Then you've never heard Phil Carli play the organ, and he does it without the sheet music in front of him.

RICHARD M ROBERTS
I've heard Dr. Carli on the piano only. And this has always been a pure pleasure. I'd love to hear him on the mighty Wurlitzer, hello SF Silent Fest! No disresprect intended.

I don't care if James plays with sheet music, he can grandstand all he wants, when he plays a film (at least every time I've been) the audience is fully into the experience and raises cheers and shouts at the end. It's the end result, a fully satisfying cinematic experience, he's never let me down.
Well, he certainly let the 1997 Cinecon audience down. He was going to play for a showing of AMARILLY OF CLOTHESLINE LANE with Mary Pickford and had come out and prepped the organ at the Alex Theater before the showing. He was at the keyboard when the lights went down, and the announced short film preceding the feature ,which was an Mary Pickford Imp called THE LETTER as I recall, began playing, and as it began, James got up and left the organ, leaving the film to run silent. Phillip Carli, who was sitting next to us in the balcony, suddenly jumped up and ran down the stairs, into the lower area of the theater, and jumped up onto the stage and began playing the piano to accompany the short to the cheers of the appreciative audience.

As I was told later, apparently James refused to play for the short because he had not prepared anything for it, even though it had been announced as part of the program. He did proceed to play for AMARILLY, sheet music in front of him, and did a good job, but Phil Carli had jumped in and under duress came up with his usually brilliant performance on the spur of the moment.

I've seen James perform since at various times, and the films I've heard him play are not utilizing any original scores, but music he has compiled, and he does a good, workmanlike job, even though the films are usually being run at rather slow speeds which I have been told he chooses. I do not have any particular problem with his performance,or even his mode of preparation, except that anyone who bills themself as the greatest silent film accompanist may be presuming a bit much. I've seen Phil Carli sit down cold and toss off absolutely brilliant scores, on piano and organ, to films he has never seen before, again and again over the years, and though I admire many accompanists, if we're voting on the greatest, I have to say to Mr. James that Phillip Carli and several others have him easily beat.

RICHARD M ROBERTS

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Unread post by misspickford9 » Thu Jul 02, 2009 2:32 am

You know maybe Im just spoiled by Bob Mitchell but I dont care for half the silent film accompanist out there.

The reason why is some of them, even the most revered ones, play the dullest dreamiest scores...even for something like a Keystone. I dont think I ever realized how much an adequate but inappropriate score bugged me until last month when Bob was out (hope he's doing well) and his young replacement was in. The film was a Louise Brooks (Beggars of Life I think) and had 2 shorts: a Laurel and Hardy and a 1914 Vitagraph polite comedy. He started out playing a dreamy nostalgia type score for the Vitagraph and it worked...but then he did the same for Laurel and Hardy and it was just ANNOYING.

Thats what Bob and Im assuming the other original people did: they pepped and vamped up their scores when it was meant to be...instead of putting everything in a dreamlike state. One other case that annoyed me was the score for the DVD of My Best Girl. Its a fine sweet score...but its no where near lively enough for the comedy that takes place.

Bob's scores usually leave me breathless, particularly is original for The Eagle even though I'd seen the film a million times his score made me go 'wow'. I've seen Pandora's Box with him, and once with another highly regarded but much younger accompanist. The second one didnt do it as much for me...he did an appropriate score but it just didnt sit as right.

I hope I dont sound like a snob, surely any person who accompanies a silent is attempting a lost art form, and are already quite talented and way better than I or others could do. But I feel a lot has been lost in translation sadly.

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Unread post by Jim Roots » Thu Jul 02, 2009 6:04 am

Don't nobody love Jon Mirsalis?


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Unread post by Harlett O'Dowd » Thu Jul 02, 2009 6:45 am

Jim Roots wrote:Don't nobody love Jon Mirsalis?


Jim
I duz. Actually, I'm shocked that *anybody* can watch a film in the dark and rattle off an appropriate score - whether from cue sheets or off the top of one's head.

I have difficulty locking the front door in the morning while saddled down with all the stuff I have to take with me to work. More times than not I end up wearing some of my coffee.

All of these artists have given me us much pleasure over the years - it's petty to rank and rankle them. We're blessed to have what we have.
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Unread post by silentfilm » Thu Jul 02, 2009 7:59 am

Jon does a great job at Cinecon. The best score that I've heard from him was Don Q, Son of Zorro on my one visit to the Niles Silent Film Museum.

A true test of an accompanist is having to play for a long, dull silent film. I've seen Phil do that several times at Cinecon. Phil can do a great score for a film that doesn't deserve one.

Gabriel Thibaudeau always does a bang-up job too. I've only heard Clark Wilson once, for Wings, and I was impressed. The film didn't seem nearly as long as the laserdisc version. I've heard Ken Double (twice) and he does a great job too.

There's certainly nothing wrong with having a prepared score. Since Mont Alto is an ensemble, it's pretty much required.

I have a hard time watching Keaton's One Week with anything other than Gaylord Carter's score. I've seen/heard it so many times, and it is one of my favorites.

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Unread post by Frederica » Thu Jul 02, 2009 8:20 am

Noting that Dennis James is great at what he does takes nothing away from other silent film accompaniests.

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Unread post by Jim Roots » Thu Jul 02, 2009 12:14 pm

Harlett O'Dowd wrote:I have difficulty locking the front door in the morning while saddled down with all the stuff I have to take with me to work. More times than not I end up wearing some of my coffee.
Come over to my place and get out of those wet clothes and into a dry martini, darling!

Jim

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Unread post by Richard M Roberts » Thu Jul 02, 2009 1:34 pm

silentfilm wrote:Jon does a great job at Cinecon. The best score that I've heard from him was Don Q, Son of Zorro on my one visit to the Niles Silent Film Museum.

A true test of an accompanist is having to play for a long, dull silent film. I've seen Phil do that several times at Cinecon. Phil can do a great score for a film that doesn't deserve one.

Gabriel Thibaudeau always does a bang-up job too. I've only heard Clark Wilson once, for Wings, and I was impressed. The film didn't seem nearly as long as the laserdisc version. I've heard Ken Double (twice) and he does a great job too.

There's certainly nothing wrong with having a prepared score. Since Mont Alto is an ensemble, it's pretty much required.

I have a hard time watching Keaton's One Week with anything other than Gaylord Carter's score. I've seen/heard it so many times, and it is one of my favorites.
It has been said many times by various film programmers (including myself) that "sick little films all go to Dr Carli" , meaning, of course, that Phil can indeed bring needed life to a film that may probably need it, but there are indeed many great accompanists out there. Ben Model is terrific, when he and Phil Carli trade off playing short programs at Slapsticon, sometimes it's hard to tell whos playing because the level of quality is that good no matter who it is, ditto for Andrew Simpson who is relatively new to the game and I think has the chops to be one of the best in the field.

Gabriel Thibaudeau has performed scores that take real chances and made me nervous that he's going to fall off the tightrope he's walking, and amazed me when he brings a new tack or point of view to a film that really makes it come to life in a way I haven't considered before, like his playing for THE MATRIMANIAC at Columbus a number of years ago, or his modern/blues score for DOCKS OF NEW YORK which was brilliant, and of course, THE CANADIAN at Cinecon. Clark Wilson is a dynamite organist, as is Bob Mitchell. Jon Mirsalis always brings great emotion to sentimental or romantic films, he's brought tears to this old ogre's eyes more than once. Rodney Sauer and the Mont Alto also do great and sensitive scoring that also beautifully reflects the original period in their music. Neal Brand is also in the absolute highest echelon of accompanists, I think he can play for anything and make it really tick.

Several of the greatest nights I ever spent watching silent films were accompanied by Bob Vaughn, I miss him as well. And Gaylord Carter playing live couldn't be beat, and he frequently used the original scores that he had in his personal collection (and had frequently played when the films has originally opened). And some of those films that ran on THE SILENT YEARS in the seventies still don't sound right without William Perry's wonderful music behind them. Would we have loved those films so much if Killiam had hired say, The Alloy Orchestra instead?

There are and were so many great accompanists, we really have to consider ourselves lucky to be able to enjoy them live, or have preserved their past performances to enjoy again and again. We need to support the good ones who are working now, especially for a field thats close to blacksmithing in it's niche' necessity to modern culture, bless those who toil to make a living in this blissfully obsolete line of work.

RICHARD M ROBERTS

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Unread post by muscur » Thu Dec 31, 2009 12:22 am

March 7, City Museum, Wenatchee, Washington
Silent film program: comedy films

March 8, Town Hall, Seattle, Washington
OdeonQuartet (string quartet) with Dennis James, Glass Armonica chamber music performance

March 11, Washington Center, Olympia, Washington
4th annual silent film series: Janet Gaynor and George O'Brien in SUNRISE

July 5, Lynwood Theatre, Bainbridge Island, Washington
Annual Anniversary silent film screenings:

July 6, Location tba, Seattle, Washington
American Theatre Organ Society National Convention - feature silent film event by invitation conveyed by convention chairman Tom Blackwell: title tba

November 13&14 Blue Mouse Theatre, Tacoma, Washington
87th Anniversary screenings

For more information, visit: http://www.cas.sc.edu/film/james.htm

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Unread post by Rob Farr » Thu Dec 31, 2009 11:31 am

muscur wrote:
For more information, visit: http://www.cas.sc.edu/film/james.htm
Dead URL.
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Unread post by JB Kaufman » Thu Dec 31, 2009 12:58 pm

Comparisons are odious, and I whole-heartedly agree with the point, made several times here, that we're blessed to be able to hear all these great talents and shouldn't try to rank or compare them. Having said that, I'm surprised that no one here has mentioned Donald Sosin, in my opinion a brilliant musician who brings out the best in any film he accompanies. His wife, vocalist Joanna Seaton, is also a great talent and has made contributions of her own (for example their performances of Lady of the Pavements, in which she recreated some of Lupe Velez' songs).
JB Kaufman

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Unread post by muscur » Thu Dec 31, 2009 2:30 pm

[quote="Rob Farr"][quote="muscur"]

For more information, visit: http://www.cas.sc.edu/film/james.htm[/quote]

Dead URL.[/quote]

Well, I just checked it and it came up just fine, although the overall tour calendar has not yet been updated for all of my upcoming 2010 performances. So, again, here is the Web Site and below that is my current up to date tour calendar:

http://www.cas.sc.edu/film/james.html

DENNIS JAMES - 2010 TOUR PERFORMANCES SCHEDULE

January 21, Washington Center, Olympia, Washington
4th annual silent film series: Greta Garbo and John Gilbert in
FLESH AND THE DEVIL
February 11, Washington Center, Olympia, Washington
4th annual silent film series: Rudolph Valentino in SON OF THE
SHEIK
February 13, Royce Hall, UCLA, Los Angeles, California
UCLA Live - Organ & Silent Film series (2pm matinee): Charlie
Chaplin in EASY STREET plus THE KID
February 14, Lynwood Theatre, Bainbridge Island, Washington
Silent film series- two screenings: Harold Lloyd in GIRL SHY
February 15, Admiral Theatre, West Seattle, Washington
Original Silent Movie Mondays site debut: William Boyd in THE
YANKEE CLIPPER
February 20, Overture Center, Madison, Wisconsin
Annual ‘Duck Soup” silent film series: Charlie Chaplin in THE
GOLD RUSH
February 26, California Theatre, San Jose, California
Annual Cinequest film festival silent films: Mae Murray in THE
MERRY WIDOW
March 5, California Theatre, San Jose, California
Annual Cinequest film festival silent films: Ramon Novarro and
Norma Shearer in THE STUDENT PRINCE IN OLD HEIDELBERG
March 7, City Museum, Wenatchee, Washington
Silent film program: comedy films tba
March 8, Town Hall, Seattle, Washington
OdeonQuartet (string quartet) with Dennis James, Glass
Armonica chamber music performance
March 11, Washington Center, Olympia, Washington
4th annual silent film series: Janet Gaynor and George O'Brien
in SUNRISE
March 15, Paramount Theatre, Seattle, Washington
Dennis James’ original Silent Movie Mondays series: Henri de \
la Falaise’s LEGONG, DANCE OF THE VIRGINS
March 19, Trinity Church, Spring Valley, California
San Diego chapter ATOS presented silent film program: Harold
Lloyd in GIRL SHY
March 22, Paramount Theatre, Seattle, Washington
Dennis James’ original Silent Movie Mondays series: F. W.
Murnau’s TABU: A STORY OF THE SOUTH SEAS
March 27, Keystone Oaks Auditorium, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Silent film debut: Wm. Boyd in THE YANKEE CLIPPER
March 29, Paramount Theatre, Seattle, Washington
Dennis James’ original Silent Movie Mondays series: Gloria
Swanson in SADIE THOMPSON
April 7, THE STUDIO, Corning, New York
Glass armonica demonstration
April 8-10, School of the Visual Arts Theatre, New York City, New York
Orphans Film Festival: titles tba
April 25, Palace Theatre, Marion, Ohio
Yannitell Memorial silent film series: Charlie Chaplin in EASY
STREET plus THE KID
May 6, Mozarteum, Salzburg, AUSTRIA
New organ debut presentation: Lon Chaney in
PHANTOM OF THE OPERA
May 21, Technology Center Auditorium, Tulsa, Oklahoma
Silent film performance: William Boyd in THE YANKEE CLIPPER
May 22,23, Coleman Theatre, Miami, Oklahoma
Silent film series program: Charlie Chaplin in EASY STREET
plus THE KID
June tba, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
Silent film series: Abel Gance’s J’ACCUSE
June 13, Palace Theatre, Marion, Ohio
Yannitell Memorial silent film series: Harold Lloyd in GIRL SHY
June 16&17, Balboa Theatre, San Diego, California
San Diego Mostly Mozart Festival- glass armonica performances
June 23, I.U. Auditorium, Bloomington, Indiana
Pipe Organ Encounters silent film performance: Lon Chaney in
PHANTOM OF THE OPERA
July 3, Paramount Theatre, Seattle, Washington
ATOS National Convention program by confirmed invitation of
convention chairman Tom Blackwell
July 5, Lynwood Theatre, Bainbridge Island, Washington
Annual Anniversary silent film screenings: title tba
July 8, Shea’s Buffalo Theatre, Buffalo, New York
Silent film program for AMICA Convention: title tba
July 15 to 18, Castro Theatre, San Francisco, California
Annual San Francisco Silent Film Festival: titles tba
August 23, Balboa Park, San Diego, California
22nd annual outdoor silent film program at the Spreckels
Organ Pavilion: William Boyd in THE YANKEE CLIPPER
*October 22, Poncan Theatre, Ponca City, Oklahoma
Annual silent film series: Halloween program tba
October 23, Embassy Theatre, Fort Wayne, Indiana
Annual silent film series: Lon Chaney in THE MONSTER
October 29, I. U. Auditorium, Bloomington, Indiana
Annual Halloween silent film performance: Roland West’s THE
BAT
October 31, Davies Symphony Hall, San Francisco, California
San Francisco Symphony 2nd annual Halloween silent film
program: title tba
November 11, Empress Theatre, Fort MacLeod, Alberta, CANADA
Aviation film festival: Wm. Wellmann’s WINGS
November 13&14, Blue Mouse Theatre, Tacoma, Washington
87th Anniversary screening: title tba
*November tba, Silent Film Festival, Shanghai, CHINA
Debut silent film festival: titles tba

*on hold - to be confirmed as of 12/31/09

Dennis James
SILENT FILM CONCERTS

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Rob Farr
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Unread post by Rob Farr » Thu Dec 31, 2009 6:18 pm

Works for me now too. Might have been temporarily down this am.
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Unread post by WaverBoy » Fri Jan 01, 2010 3:34 pm

March 15, Paramount Theatre, Seattle, Washington
Dennis James’ original Silent Movie Mondays series: Henri de \
la Falaise’s LEGONG, DANCE OF THE VIRGINS
Cool, looks like Dennis is back with Silent Movie Mondays at the Paramount!

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Unread post by milefilms » Fri Jan 01, 2010 6:46 pm

WaverBoy wrote:
March 15, Paramount Theatre, Seattle, Washington
Dennis James’ original Silent Movie Mondays series: Henri de \
la Falaise’s LEGONG, DANCE OF THE VIRGINS
Cool, looks like Dennis is back with Silent Movie Mondays at the Paramount!
And Legong is a very underestimated film. The color (thanks to Bob Gitt and YCM) is tremendous, the cast is very beautiful (and topless), the dancing is extremely well done and authentic, and the story line is very simple but very moving. It's one of the favorite DVDs we've produced.
Dennis Doros
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TinamB
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Unread post by TinamB » Fri Jan 01, 2010 10:55 pm

Uh, I'd check the Paramount's website about Dennis being back. It's my understanding he's burned too many bridges there for that to ever happen again...

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Harlett O'Dowd
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Unread post by Harlett O'Dowd » Sat Jan 02, 2010 10:04 am

milefilms wrote:
And Legong is a very underestimated film. The color (thanks to Bob Gitt and YCM) is tremendous, the cast is very beautiful (and topless), the dancing is extremely well done and authentic, and the story line is very simple but very moving. It's one of the favorite DVDs we've produced.
:shock:

Did I know you had released this on DVD?

As soon as I successfully balance my bank account...
Christopher S. Connelly

http://www.nitanaldi.com" target="_blank

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milefilms
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Unread post by milefilms » Mon Jan 04, 2010 8:03 am

Harlett O'Dowd wrote:
:shock:

Did I know you had released this on DVD?

As soon as I successfully balance my bank account...
Wow, I really didn't intend it to be a secret but judging by the sales of the DVD, I must have :lol:
Dennis Doros
Milestone F&V

Marr&Colton
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Unread post by Marr&Colton » Mon Jan 04, 2010 3:47 pm

Hello forum,

Just to keep the record straight, a poster on this thread right now is Dennis James himself.


He is indeed one of the greatest silent film organists of our time.
If one would like to know more, I suggest joining that list.
www.theatreorgans.com


With great musical talent often goes temperament.
Last edited by Marr&Colton on Mon Jan 04, 2010 11:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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rudyfan
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Unread post by rudyfan » Mon Jan 04, 2010 4:34 pm

Marr&Colton wrote:Hello forum,

Just to keep the record straight, a poster on this thread right now is Dennis James himself.


He is indeed one of the greatest silent film organists of our time.
If one would like to know more, I suggest joining that list.
www.theatreorgans.com

Dennis' clashes with various theatre/organ/booking folk over the years is no secret.

With great musical talent often goes temperament.
I make no bones about my delight in hearing Dennis James, and said so earlier in this thread.
http://www.rudolph-valentino.com" target="_blank" target="_blank
http://nitanaldi.com" target="_blank" target="_blank
http://www.dorothy-gish.com" target="_blank" target="_blank

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milefilms
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Unread post by milefilms » Mon Jan 04, 2010 7:51 pm

Marr&Colton wrote:
With great musical talent often goes temperament.
Not to get too off-topic, but wasn't this from Spiderman?

Honestly, always liked dealing with Dennis J --
Dennis Doros
Milestone F&V

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