OLED TV's for B&W movies.

Technically-oriented discussion of classic films on everything from 35mm to Blu-Ray
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Changsham
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OLED TV's for B&W movies.

Unread post by Changsham » Sun Dec 18, 2016 2:16 pm

I miss the superior contrast of old CRT TV's for watching B&W movies. LED TV's are disapointing and Plasma is finished. I am impressed by the impressive contrast specs of the new OLED TV's though they are still mighty expensive. They look great in the shop displays but how good are they with B&W? Any one own one or have an opinion?

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syd
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Re: OLED TV's for B&W movies.

Unread post by syd » Mon Dec 19, 2016 2:18 am

OLED technology is great but don't underestimate
LED televisions. With proper calibration you could
get better results that only get marginally improved by
OLED.

Read the specs and test results of LED televisions.
Gray uniformity and contrast tests are usually good
indicators of how they will perform with B/W material.

All Darc
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Re: OLED TV's for B&W movies.

Unread post by All Darc » Sun Jan 01, 2017 7:40 pm

Please forgive me to say that, but I challenge anyone on this planet to show me a LED (LCD with LED backlight) that it's not a crap.
Every single time I went to store and ask for a good TV without anoying effects, or anoying image at low angle, I end up disapointed and angry, cause all models I ever checked was a piece of s... ALL MODELS. Even IPS technology it's a hoax cause the image get darker even without go too much on lateral.
And all models crush (cliped) tones near white tone killing the bright tonalities making it a mess, a mass of pure white. Shadows are also crush shadow making it pure black killing intermediary tonalities.

I just can't understand people that 8 years ago was already buying a lot of LCD TVS when the image quality was still a lot worse than today. Why people tolerate such sh... ?

You talk about calibration, but if you calibrate the LCD TV to do not crush intermediar white tones and to not crush shadows, you got a faded image, without life, while on CRT TV you do not get crushed whites and crushed shadows even if you increase contrast, and the image do not distort or get dark in you look in a lower angle.

For me LCD will always be a garbage in such characteristics, if compared to a CRT.

viewtopic.php?f=17&t=23379" target="_blank" target="_blank
syd wrote:OLED technology is great but don't underestimate
LED televisions. With proper calibration you could
get better results that only get marginally improved by
OLED.

Read the specs and test results of LED televisions.
Gray uniformity and contrast tests are usually good
indicators of how they will perform with B/W material.
Last edited by All Darc on Wed Jan 04, 2017 8:07 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Marr&Colton
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Re: OLED TV's for B&W movies.

Unread post by Marr&Colton » Tue Jan 03, 2017 8:44 am

I get best B&W resolution with DLP digital projection--the new projectors made after 2015

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syd
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Re: OLED TV's for B&W movies.

Unread post by syd » Tue Jan 03, 2017 1:50 pm

I was comparing LCD to OLED not CRT.

All Darc
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Re: OLED TV's for B&W movies.

Unread post by All Darc » Tue Jan 03, 2017 3:12 pm

I still did not saw a OLED TV. Do it get darker if watched by a 45 degree angle ?
Do it cliped/crushed white tones making the bright tonalities purê white when you increase contrast adjust ?

LCD it's not decent due these limitations. If OLED still have these same limitations... :roll:
syd wrote:I was comparing LCD to OLED not CRT.
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Changsham
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Re: OLED TV's for B&W movies.

Unread post by Changsham » Wed Jan 04, 2017 3:28 am

I bit the bullet and bought an OLED TV. I got a run out LG Full HD model at a good price and not the 4K versions which will now be the only ones available. I would have to say the image quality is stunning with incredible contrast and colour. The viewing angle is far superior to any LED TV with extreme angles over 80 degrees showing little if any image degradation.

Being a 55 inch TV, standard DVD's need tweaking to look good. Blu Ray's look sensational. A few minor issues are that the TV is not as bright as the better LED TV's and blacks can get crushed in overly dark scenes. Whites look great with no issues. Grey uniformity is excellent compared to LED. Would have to be the best TV I have seen by far. OLED appears to be the TV technology of the future ATM.

All Darc
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Re: OLED TV's for B&W movies.

Unread post by All Darc » Wed Jan 04, 2017 8:39 am

Blu Ray image compression it's worse than most used in DVDs in some aspects. The gradientes near shadows are not good in most Blu Rays. Even so there are few gradientes, but most TVs crush it into a single black tone. And OLED, accodirng Changshaw.

So even OLED TV have defects...

Holly Sh...
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All Darc
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Re: OLED TV's for B&W movies.

Unread post by All Darc » Fri Jan 06, 2017 12:19 pm

Today I check a Samsung 50 inch 4K HDR LED Smart-TV on a store.

It only didn't blow-up (clipped) brighd white tones and do not crushed dark shadows if the signal was in HDR, like the HDR 4K sample clips that come with it.

On standart HD mode (1920p) the glossy image (adjusted to a bit glossy) destroyed the white tonalities and shadows. But if you calibrate it to do not destroy tonalities, the image looks quite faded.

But a CRT-TV do not blow-up bright tones even in a old analogic transmission.

Why it's need a HDR signal to avoit blow-up of tonalities in a HDR TV if a CRT TV screen don't need a HDR signal to avoid blow-upup

WHY ?????????????????

Again, not a single TV on the store that please me. All shit. This same new model of Samsun LED 50 also get the screen darker if looked by a lower angle like 45 degree or even less.

When could I buy a TV??? God sackes... not a single one that I judge as decent.

No kidding, I can't stand in front of such LED backlight TVs, it makes me sick to look to blow-uo tones ands crushed shadowns It's repulsive, disgusting for me to look to. Even If I have 4K HDR signal and a collection of HDR films, the view angle getting darker, if not direct in front of it, it's disturbing.

A CRT TV even in a analogic signal of even 10 years ago, do not destroy contrast like the damn LDC/LED technology do.
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All Darc
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Re: OLED TV's for B&W movies.

Unread post by All Darc » Wed Jan 11, 2017 5:40 pm

Relatives here got a Samsung 50inch LED 4K HDR. And I really prefere the old Sony Trinitron 29 inch 4:3 CRT TV.

LED TVs are faded, it's like watch DVD in PC CRT monitor 15 years ago. PC CRT monitors had different contrast base than TV CRT monitors, and the image got fadded no mater adjust you sosse, and if trey to increase contrast adjust the whites get crushed, clipped, purê White, killing tonalities. CRT TVs displayed a fine contrast without kill bright tonalities.

Today it's like LCD mopnitor and LCD TVs have the same contrast standart and all images get fadded or kill tonalities near White and near black if tyyou increase contrast adjust/slider.

For me this is the ultimate absurd, a crime, there are no TV for sale today that do not destroys image contrast. I went to several stores and all models was shit. Edited: (no OLED modelin my city)

And 4K it's another lie, have many artefats, most details desapiers with motions, even very little motion. Full HD broadcast was a lie, sometimes worse than DVD, and now most 4K are lie, worse than a prime full HD blu ray. The 4K clips I got on web it's like bad broadcast. Artefacts, poor gradientes, with noticeable change of tonalities.

I never saw a OLED but I hope it will be better than this genocide of dynamics range, genocide of contrast, genocide of view angle, this genocidade of quality named LED/LCD technology.

If I had a wish from Aladdi's lamp, I would desire to eliminatre all LCD screens from Earth. :lol:

I can't enjoy entertainment looking to a LCD/LED screen. Trully, no kidding. It's all a piece of garbage to me.

Changsham wrote:I miss the superior contrast of old CRT TV's for watching B&W movies. LED TV's are disapointing and Plasma is finished. I am impressed by the impressive contrast specs of the new OLED TV's though they are still mighty expensive. They look great in the shop displays but how good are they with B&W? Any one own one or have an opinion?
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Great Hierophant
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Re: OLED TV's for B&W movies.

Unread post by Great Hierophant » Fri Jan 13, 2017 7:09 pm

TVs on display in the stores use these display factory presets that tend to make them look extremely bright or saturated. They also tend to commit greater crimes against film like turning on high frame rate interpolation.

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Christopher Jacobs
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Re: OLED TV's for B&W movies.

Unread post by Christopher Jacobs » Mon Jan 16, 2017 5:27 pm

Great Hierophant wrote:TVs on display in the stores use these display factory presets that tend to make them look extremely bright or saturated. They also tend to commit greater crimes against film like turning on high frame rate interpolation.
Virtually every video equipment product, including TV sets, projectors, and Blu-ray players, must be readjusted manually in at least one or more custom settings after getting them home to have a properly displayed image. Any automatic digital noise reduction and various other "enhancements" need to be turned off, and the image should be in "Cinema" mode rather than "Sports" or "Game" or some other setting. Minor color and contrast adjustments can then be made after that, if necessary. My Sony LCD TV (40-inch screen) looks quite nice, although many if not most people would claim it looks "too dark" because they're used to watching TV with the room lights on and sunlight coming through windows. In a properly darkened room, it looks just fine with a wide range of contrast and colors visible. Still, it's much preferable and more natural to watch a reflected image projected onto a screen instead of staring at a light source whether it's an LCD or CRT.

My Panasonic LCD projector image looks extremely film-like when projecting Blu-rays onto a big screen using the "Cinema 2" mode, but again that is notably darker than the "standard" or "Dynamic" modes, which I only switch to for 3-D projection due to the darkening effect of the glasses, and the color/contrast balance is slightly different for "Cinema 1," "Digital Cinema" and several other choices which can sometimes "fix" the picture on discs with non-standard authoring. A projected image should always be shown in a dark room (although I have dimmable aisle lights and wall sconces that I always set at their minimum brightness so people won't trip over the risers that hold the seats). The player's output settings often must be adjusted as well for an optimum image (some have their own noise reduction and "normal room," "bright room," and "theatre room" settings separate from the settings on the TV set or monitor. It takes a while to get everything calibrated so they work together with a suitable image. Of course the aspect ratio is another major setting that usually needs to be reset manually from the factory preset (both on the player and on the TV monitor or projector). It may also help if you can convert a 60i signal into a 30p signal (or perhaps vice-versa in certain cases).

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Donald Binks
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Re: OLED TV's for B&W movies.

Unread post by Donald Binks » Mon Jan 16, 2017 6:42 pm

I have always believed that when watching the TV one should have a light on? To not do so would harm the eyes. I don't know the veracity of this statement but it seems entrenched in my mind from reading about how to avoid eyesight problems years back. I can't stand bright lights and so only have a table lamp on which emits about 25 watts. (Bright young things these days seem to like everything lit up like Luna Park). (Mind you I am not talking here about projected TV. I used to have a home cinema and had total darkness when playing a projected DVD).
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syd
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Re: OLED TV's for B&W movies.

Unread post by syd » Wed Jan 18, 2017 12:50 pm

[quote="All Darc"]Relatives here got a Samsung 50inch LED 4K HDR. And I really prefere the old Sony Trinitron 29 inch 4:3 CRT TV.

LED TVs are faded, it's like watch DVD in PC CRT monitor 15 years ago. PC CRT monitors had different contrast base than TV CRT monitors, and the image got fadded no mater adjust you sosse, and if trey to increase contrast adjust the whites get crushed, clipped, purê White, killing tonalities. CRT TVs displayed a fine contrast without kill bright tonalities.

Today it's like LCD mopnitor and LCD TVs have the same contrast standart and all images get fadded or kill tonalities near White and near black if tyyou increase contrast adjust/slider.

For me this is the ultimate absurd, a crime, there are no TV for sale today that do not destroys image contrast. I went to several stores and all models was shit. [b]Edited:[/b] (no OLED modelin my city)

And 4K it's another lie, have many artefats, most details desapiers with motions, even very little motion. Full HD broadcast was a lie, sometimes worse than DVD, and now most 4K are lie, worse than a prime full HD blu ray. The 4K clips I got on web it's like bad broadcast. Artefacts, poor gradientes, with noticeable change of tonalities.

I never saw a OLED but I hope it will be better than this genocide of dynamics range, genocide of contrast, genocide of view angle, this genocidade of quality named LED/LCD technology.

If I had a wish from Aladdi's lamp, I would desire to eliminatre all LCD screens from Earth. :lol:

I can't enjoy entertainment looking to a LCD/LED screen. Trully, no kidding. It's all a piece of garbage to me.


[quote="Changsham"]I miss the superior contrast of old CRT TV's for watching B&W movies. LED TV's are disapointing and Plasma is finished. I am impressed by the impressive contrast specs of the new OLED TV's though they are still mighty expensive. They look great in the shop displays but how good are they with B&W? Any one own one or have an opinion?[/quote][/quote]



I am glad to have lived long enough to be able to watch TV like George Jetson.
Sure the CRT excelled in certain display parameters but we have finally advanced
to wall sized displays.

Do you go to trade shows All Darc? There are some digital displays
at them that will astound you and make you a believer. Do not mistake
retail store displays for displays at trade shows.

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MoviecollectorOH
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Re: OLED TV's for B&W movies.

Unread post by MoviecollectorOH » Thu Jan 19, 2017 8:19 am

My preference of successor to CRT would be OLED or Plasma, but Plasma has been discontinued. Simply because they seem to manage light better than LCD/LED screens. Not that there is anything wrong with LCD/LED, but they both have backlights that are always on.

Higher end CRTs did a good job of putting light where it was supposed to be, and keeping the rest dark - in part because the light was coming through a mask which helped define it. Also because (on a very good CRT) the phosphors only lit up where they were supposed to.

Similar to a high-quality CRT, the light you see coming from the OLED and Plasma screens "is" the light source. The rest can be pitch black. So these are a natural for movies, in my opinion.

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