Harold Lloyd and 3-D

Open, general discussion of classic sound-era films, personalities and history.
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Bob Furmanek
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Harold Lloyd and 3-D

Unread post by Bob Furmanek » Thu Oct 05, 2017 11:05 am

There's newly-found information in this article on Harold Lloyd's early interest in 3-D cinematography: http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/sangaree" target="_blank

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Daniel D. Teoli Jr.
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Re: Harold Lloyd and 3-D

Unread post by Daniel D. Teoli Jr. » Thu Oct 05, 2017 2:34 pm

He was known for 3d nude stills as well.

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Bob Furmanek
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Re: Harold Lloyd and 3-D

Unread post by Bob Furmanek » Thu Oct 05, 2017 2:39 pm

That was post-1947 with the introduction of the Stereo Realist camera.

moviepas
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Re: Harold Lloyd and 3-D

Unread post by moviepas » Sun Oct 08, 2017 2:38 am

A box set of Harold Lloyd features etc had a disc with his 3-D photographs. I think this was the US set. The UK set did not have the disc but rather a Lloyd feature not on the US set, Welcome Danger.

Daniel Eagan
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Re: Harold Lloyd and 3-D

Unread post by Daniel Eagan » Mon Oct 09, 2017 8:33 am

You can buy his 3D photos in a book supplied with 3D glasses: https://www.amazon.com/3-D-Hollywood-Su ... 0671769480" target="_blank

There's also a book devoted solely to the nudes.

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Re: Harold Lloyd and 3-D

Unread post by coolcatdaddy » Mon Nov 20, 2017 8:05 pm

I've often wondered if the availability and popularity of the Realist and Kodak 3D still cameras for home use helped technicians working in Hollywood prepare for their work on 3D features in the early 50s. In the 90s, I did quite a bit of 3D still photography and it was helpful to understand what kind of lighting and compositions worked well (and no so well) for good 3D effects.

Several of the 50s era films I've seen in 3D seem to be more planned for the format - many of the current batch of 3D movies from the past decade seem to be framed and thought out for 2D with the 3D an afterthought.

Any idea how many of the people that worked on the 3D classics of the 50s experimented with Realist and Kodak 3D still cameras before they started work on a 3D feature?

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