Gallery of Mastheads

Comments related to the operation of NitrateVille.
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Jim Roots
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by Jim Roots » Sun Sep 02, 2018 7:39 am

With apologies to Bob Fells, this photo makes Arliss look like the most unattractive man since Neanderthal times. It literally makes him look like a cross between a chimpanzee and a feral pig.

He wasn't that bad-looking!

Jim

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bobfells
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by bobfells » Sun Sep 02, 2018 10:13 pm

Mike said that he was looking for a photo that had "personality" so I proposed a few, among them was the one that graces the N'ville Masthead for September. The portrait was taken in conjunction with THE WORKING MAN (1933), which was a remake of $20 DOLLARS A WEEK. I rather like the photo and a close examination of my 8x10 inch original reveals Mr. A to have a distinct five o'clock shadow that puts him right in style with the contemporary male fashion of today. As for Mr. Roots' disapproval, I'm reminded of something Will Rogers told a reporter: "I don't care what you say about me, just spell my name right."

BTW, this year marks the 150th anniversary of Mr. A's birth so I made up this little video to mark the occasion:

https://youtu.be/Dns0RUYYs84
Official Biographer of Mr. Arliss

http://www.ArlissArchives.com" target="_blank
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Hamilton's Grandson
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by Hamilton's Grandson » Sun Sep 02, 2018 10:42 pm

Nice tribute on YT and great selection of colored stills.

Thanks for increasing our awareness of Arliss.
Mark Hamilton (I) is on imdb.com
Joseph Hamilton (I) is on imdb.com
Gertrude Brooke Hamilton is on imdb.com

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Jim Roots
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by Jim Roots » Mon Sep 03, 2018 7:28 am

Apologies for the misspelling of your name, bobfells.

Jim

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bobfells
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by bobfells » Mon Sep 03, 2018 10:28 pm

Jim Roots wrote:
Mon Sep 03, 2018 7:28 am
Apologies for the misspelling of your name, bobfells.

Jim
I've been called worse.

Bob
Official Biographer of Mr. Arliss

http://www.ArlissArchives.com" target="_blank
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Mike Gebert
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by Mike Gebert » Sun Sep 30, 2018 7:59 pm

Image

It started in January 1918 with a country doctor who noticed so much flu in Haskell County, Kansas that he took the unusual step of reporting it to the U.S. Public Health Service. Around the same time, soldiers from Haskell County traveled to Camp Funston at Fort Riley, Kansas. An army camp would prove to be a perfect vector for quickly spreading disease, first within the camp and then to other places around the country‚ and then, because World War I was still raging, to places around the world. By October 1918, its deadliest month, the so-called Spanish Flu was a global pandemic.

And so the industrial world proved remarkably efficient at spreading disease worldwide. Among the millions who would die from it—more than would die in World War I itself, if you don't consider the pandemic an effect of the war—are three figures of American motion pictures shown on this month's masthead. On the right, the popular star Harold Lockwood, who died on October 19. In the center, the actress Myrtle Gonzalez, who died October 22nd. And on the left, John H. Collins, a leading director and husband of the star Viola Dana, who died on the 23rd. Some threads:

1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects
INFLUENZA 1918 - American Experience
Harold Lockwood
John H. Collins - Wow!
NEW KICKSTARTER: THE COSSACK WHIP (1916)

Ed Lorusso has a good blog post about it here.
“I'm in favor of plagiarism. If we are to create a new Renaissance, the government should encourage plagiarism. When convinced that someone is a true plagiarist, we should immediately award them the Legion of Honor.” —Jean Renoir

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Brooksie
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by Brooksie » Sun Sep 30, 2018 11:33 pm

The list of casualties from Variety, included as part of Ed's blog post, is truly sobering. The number of later-to-be-famous names that can be found amongst the survivors makes you wonder what might have been.

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boblipton
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by boblipton » Mon Oct 01, 2018 3:31 am

The loss of life is terrible. However, I think there was a pause in the advancement of cinematic art, a lack of innovation, in the period from 1918 through 1920. I had attributed it to the period of economic confusion, the fact that America could sell into a Europe finally at peace with almost no German or French production and so no need to stretch. This month's masthead notes another factor: people in a position to push, died.

Bob
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

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drednm
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by drednm » Mon Oct 01, 2018 4:57 am

Brooksie wrote:
Sun Sep 30, 2018 11:33 pm
The list of casualties from Variety, included as part of Ed's blog post, is truly sobering. The number of later-to-be-famous names that can be found amongst the survivors makes you wonder what might have been.
That page from Variety I posted was one page from one issue. There was one article I found, and I'm sure there were many more, where a man was shot and killed because he was not wearing a flu mask when he tried to board a street car. It must have been a terrifying thing to go thru.
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s.w.a.c.
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by s.w.a.c. » Mon Oct 01, 2018 5:17 am

My grandfather was stationed at the Great Lakes Naval Station north of Chicago, which was an epicentre of the outbreak in that region.

Here's a recent piece on it from the Chicago Tribune.

There was an American Experience doc about the epidemic not too long ago, worth seeking out.
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linquist
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by linquist » Mon Oct 01, 2018 7:27 am

Not sure if any of this is in any of the posted links so::
SHOULDER ARMS was released just as the pandemic started and I have come across articles that said that people defied medical bans in order to see the film. It was the one film that continued to have packed houses through the pandemic, when theaters were open. I had also read that the major stars had a number of studio doctors/nurses by their side. Supposedly, Mary Pickford had a staff of health care workers and Dorothy Gish was sent to live with the Talmadges when Lillian came down with it. Griffith and Sennett also kept their studios open and Lillian Gish was barely into recovery when she filmed BROKEN BLOSSOMS.

Also, the source of the flu seems to be changing. A recent history book on WWI that I read mentioned the usual suspect: China. In this semi-substantiated theory, Britain imported Chinese worked and transported them across Canada. Supposedly, some of these workers already had the flu and there are supposed to be mass graves of Chinese workers somewhere in Canada. Now sure how this got to America beyond proximity.

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drednm
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by drednm » Mon Oct 01, 2018 7:52 am

linquist wrote:
Mon Oct 01, 2018 7:27 am
Not sure if any of this is in any of the posted links so::
SHOULDER ARMS was released just as the pandemic started and I have come across articles that said that people defied medical bans in order to see the film. It was the one film that continued to have packed houses through the pandemic, when theaters were open. I had also read that the major stars had a number of studio doctors/nurses by their side. Supposedly, Mary Pickford had a staff of health care workers and Dorothy Gish was sent to live with the Talmadges when Lillian came down with it. Griffith and Sennett also kept their studios open and Lillian Gish was barely into recovery when she filmed BROKEN BLOSSOMS.

Also, the source of the flu seems to be changing. A recent history book on WWI that I read mentioned the usual suspect: China. In this semi-substantiated theory, Britain imported Chinese worked and transported them across Canada. Supposedly, some of these workers already had the flu and there are supposed to be mass graves of Chinese workers somewhere in Canada. Now sure how this got to America beyond proximity.
Some accounts name Boston and some name Kansas. Nobody knew what it was. It was also enabled in Europe in the many filthy military hospitals, so many in the military died from the flu but were listed as war casualties. Griffith was forced to keep working because of money issues. He wore a flu mask while filming The Girl Who Stayed Home, which starred Carol Dempster because Lillian Gish was ill. I know I've seen a photo of GWG wearing a mask while directing but cannot find it online.
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Brooksie
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by Brooksie » Mon Oct 01, 2018 11:27 am

drednm wrote:
Mon Oct 01, 2018 4:57 am
Brooksie wrote:
Sun Sep 30, 2018 11:33 pm
The list of casualties from Variety, included as part of Ed's blog post, is truly sobering. The number of later-to-be-famous names that can be found amongst the survivors makes you wonder what might have been.
That page from Variety I posted was one page from one issue. There was one article I found, and I'm sure there were many more, where a man was shot and killed because he was not wearing a flu mask when he tried to board a street car. It must have been a terrifying thing to go thru.
One of my great-great uncles was arrested and fined for not wearing his flu mask on public transport. Ironically, his brother, who was fighting on the Western Front, had what was probably the same flu in the very early stages of the epidemic.

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tthacker
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by tthacker » Mon Oct 01, 2018 6:56 pm

I have a couple of photos of Myrtle Gonzalez in my collection, this one being my favorite.

Image
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Brooksie
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by Brooksie » Mon Oct 01, 2018 8:55 pm

Myrtle seems to have been a very interesting performer - an action girl along the lines of Helen Holmes or Helen Gibson. I covered her lost film The Chalice of Courage (1915) in my 1916 Film Diary - see https://brooksieatthemovies.weebly.com/may-1916.html.

The number of performers I covered who were affected by the disease gives some idea of its reach. The French performer Gladys Deslys was another victim, while Olga Petrova, Alice Guy Blaché, Mary Pickford and possibly Theda Bara were amongst the survivors.

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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by drednm » Tue Oct 02, 2018 12:05 pm

I found an article that listed Charlie Chaplin and Rudolph Valentino (sick for 5 weeks) as survivors. It also talked about Viola Dana's complete nervous breakdown after Collins' death PLUS she had a slight bout with the flu as did sister Shirley Mason. It also listed Own Moore, Thomas Meighan, Mae Marsh and sister Marguerite Marsh. Also listed were Mary Pickford, but moreso Lottie Pickford. Also listed are Texas Guinan, Howard Hickman, and Bill Russell (I'm not familiar with these last two).
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Mike Gebert
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by Mike Gebert » Tue Oct 02, 2018 1:07 pm

So strange coincidence—the first time I had heard of Gaby Deslys, which I think is the actual name of the flu victim mentioned above as Gladys Deslys, was yesterday afternoon. A few hours later, I saw her name for the second time in a Facebook post, as the owner of a famously opulent bed, which upon her death was purchased by MGM's prop department... and has had a very long life since.
“I'm in favor of plagiarism. If we are to create a new Renaissance, the government should encourage plagiarism. When convinced that someone is a true plagiarist, we should immediately award them the Legion of Honor.” —Jean Renoir

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drednm
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by drednm » Tue Oct 02, 2018 2:43 pm

and Gloria Swanson in 1919.

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drednm
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by drednm » Tue Oct 02, 2018 2:49 pm

Mike Gebert wrote:
Tue Oct 02, 2018 1:07 pm
So strange coincidence—the first time I had heard of Gaby Deslys, which I think is the actual name of the flu victim mentioned above as Gladys Deslys, was yesterday afternoon. A few hours later, I saw her name for the second time in a Facebook post, as the owner of a famously opulent bed, which upon her death was purchased by MGM's prop department... and has had a very long life since.
I only know this name because she appeared in the Broadway show Stop! Look! Listen! with Marion Davies in 1915.
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Brooksie
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by Brooksie » Tue Oct 02, 2018 9:14 pm

Mike Gebert wrote:
Tue Oct 02, 2018 1:07 pm
So strange coincidence—the first time I had heard of Gaby Deslys, which I think is the actual name of the flu victim mentioned above as Gladys Deslys, was yesterday afternoon. A few hours later, I saw her name for the second time in a Facebook post, as the owner of a famously opulent bed, which upon her death was purchased by MGM's prop department... and has had a very long life since.
It is indeed Gaby Deslys (ah, autocorrect ... at least it was so baffled by 'Deslys' that it didn't even try to unscramble it ...)

She's one of those performers who was a household name in her day, but comes up today only in the odd anecdote - a kind of French equivalent to Irene Castle.

A capsule summary of her film career: she was another of the 'famous players' of the stage that Adolph Zukor attempted to transform into a screen star. The pseudo-autobiographical Her Triumph (1915) was her only American film, though she looked poised to make a screen comeback in 1919, when the French picture Infatuation (1919) was released stateside to coincide with her appearance on Broadway. By all accounts, it was a huge success on the basis of the star's name. Presumably, she caught the flu while in America, and Stop! Look! Listen! proved her swansong.

None of her films survive, so we'll probably never know whether she and dance partner Henry Pilcer might one day have challenged Fred and Ginger's mantle, as has sometimes been suggested.

https://brooksieatthemovies.weebly.com/ ... -1916.html

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Jim Roots
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by Jim Roots » Wed Oct 03, 2018 5:22 am

But she was absolutely huge in France and other parts of Europe.

Jim

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Brooksie
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by Brooksie » Wed Oct 03, 2018 10:59 am

Jim Roots wrote:
Wed Oct 03, 2018 5:22 am
But she was absolutely huge in France and other parts of Europe.

Jim
And elsewhere - Infatuation did gangbuster business in prestige city houses all across America on the basis of Deslys' name (though laid an egg in the 'nabes and stix').

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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by drednm » Wed Oct 03, 2018 11:07 am

Brooksie wrote:
Wed Oct 03, 2018 10:59 am
Jim Roots wrote:
Wed Oct 03, 2018 5:22 am
But she was absolutely huge in France and other parts of Europe.

Jim
And elsewhere - Infatuation did gangbuster business in prestige city houses all across America on the basis of Deslys' name (though laid an egg in the 'nabes and stix').
How in hell is that last name pronounced?
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Brooksie
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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

Unread post by Brooksie » Wed Oct 03, 2018 2:26 pm

drednm wrote:
Wed Oct 03, 2018 11:07 am
Brooksie wrote:
Wed Oct 03, 2018 10:59 am
Jim Roots wrote:
Wed Oct 03, 2018 5:22 am
But she was absolutely huge in France and other parts of Europe.

Jim
And elsewhere - Infatuation did gangbuster business in prestige city houses all across America on the basis of Deslys' name (though laid an egg in the 'nabes and stix').
How in hell is that last name pronounced?
De-Lee. Similar to 'fleur de lys'.

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