Words introduced by movies

Comments related to the operation of NitrateVille.
User avatar
Serch
Posts: 41
Joined: Tue Apr 26, 2011 10:13 am

Words introduced by movies

Unread post by Serch » Wed Feb 29, 2012 11:10 am

Hi everyone!
I am about to start my senior year at college and I have been thinking about a good thesis proposal, and I came up with the idea that (since I am studying english language) I should chose as a topic "the words that were introduced or popularized"by movies.
I have other topics for the thesis proposal as well, but this is so much fun and I was wondering if you could help me find those words,I only know "movies", "paparazzi", and I think thats it...There must have been some words that were used for some decades and then were forgotten, I´d like to know about them as well.
so, any ideas?
Thank you in advance!

User avatar
silentfilm
Moderator
Posts: 9432
Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 12:31 pm
Location: Dallas, TX USA
Contact:

Re: Words introduced by movies

Unread post by silentfilm » Wed Feb 29, 2012 12:14 pm

Cinema, Kino, flickers, flapper and vamp.

User avatar
Serch
Posts: 41
Joined: Tue Apr 26, 2011 10:13 am

Re: Words introduced by movies

Unread post by Serch » Wed Feb 29, 2012 12:27 pm

Thank you so much!

User avatar
Rick Lanham
Posts: 2041
Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2009 10:16 pm
Location: Gainesville, FL

Re: Words introduced by movies

Unread post by Rick Lanham » Wed Feb 29, 2012 1:13 pm

Chaplinesque.

User avatar
Donald Binks
Posts: 3139
Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:08 am
Location: Somewhere, over the rainbow

Re: Words introduced by movies

Unread post by Donald Binks » Wed Mar 07, 2012 6:16 am

"Flea pit" - a cinema not distinguished by its comfort.
Regards from
Donald Binks

"So, she said: "Elly, it's no use letting Lou have the sherry glasses..."She won't appreciate them,
she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."

User avatar
Penfold
Posts: 1315
Joined: Mon May 26, 2008 2:03 pm
Location: Bwistol, England.

Re: Words introduced by movies

Unread post by Penfold » Wed Mar 07, 2012 7:52 am

I could use some digital restoration myself...

User avatar
Frederica
Posts: 4853
Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 1:00 pm
Location: Kowea Town, Los Angeles

Re: Words introduced by movies

Unread post by Frederica » Wed Aug 29, 2012 12:34 pm

CelinaC wrote:As far as I know, the word 'Zombie' was introduced in "Night of the Living Dead" movie :)
"Zombie" is Haitian creole, my dictionary tells me its etymology is from the Kimbundo word "nzambi." It's been around for a much longer time than the Dead films, half of New Orleans' French Quarter is given over to zombie paraphernalia and How To books (which have never done me a bit of good). Val Lewton had the earlier "I Walked With a Zombie" so Romero wasn't the first filmmaker to use the word, either. Hmmm, now there's an important film history question, up there with bird kissing, murphy beds, and pillow fights--when did the first zombie appear in a film?
Fred
"Screw the men. I've got the horse."
Helen B. (Penny) Chenery
http://www.nitanaldi.com" target="_blank"
http://www.facebook.com/NitaNaldiSilentVamp" target="_blank"

User avatar
boblipton
Posts: 6280
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: Words introduced by movies

Unread post by boblipton » Wed Aug 29, 2012 12:46 pm

Frederica wrote:
CelinaC wrote:As far as I know, the word 'Zombie' was introduced in "Night of the Living Dead" movie :)
"Zombie" is Haitian creole, my dictionary tells me its etymology is from the Kimbundo word "nzambi." It's been around for a much longer time than the Dead films, half of New Orleans' French Quarter is given over to zombie paraphernalia and How To books (which have never done me a bit of good). Val Lewton had the earlier "I Walked With a Zombie" so Romero wasn't the first filmmaker to use the word, either. Hmmm, now there's an important film history question, up there with bird kissing, murphy beds, and pillow fights--when did the first zombie appear in a film?

I don't have an OED, which is just the book for this question. However, my pocket AHD gives the same etymology that you offer and says the Kimbundo word means "departed spirit". As for the earliest use, 1932's WHITE ZOMBIE knocks it back more than a decade. The IMDB has a keyword listing for "zombie" back to a couple of Disney movies from 1929 -- but I don't recall the word "zombie" being used in either -- neither of which I have seen in several years.

Bob
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

User avatar
Frederica
Posts: 4853
Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 1:00 pm
Location: Kowea Town, Los Angeles

Re: Words introduced by movies

Unread post by Frederica » Wed Aug 29, 2012 12:58 pm

boblipton wrote: I don't have an OED, which is just the book for this question. However, my pocket AHD gives the same etymology that you offer and says the Kimbundo word means "departed spirit". As for the earliest use, 1932's WHITE ZOMBIE knocks it back more than a decade. The IMDB has a keyword listing for "zombie" back to a couple of Disney movies from 1929 -- but I don't recall the word "zombie" being used in either -- neither of which I have seen in several years.

Bob
Then the word must have been familiar by then, they wouldn't have given the film a title that would have the paying public muttering "White What? Let's not go see that."

Should we start a Zombie thread, rather than hijacking this one? It will make it easier for people to list early film zombie sightings. Those future film historians, you know.
Fred
"Screw the men. I've got the horse."
Helen B. (Penny) Chenery
http://www.nitanaldi.com" target="_blank"
http://www.facebook.com/NitaNaldiSilentVamp" target="_blank"

User avatar
countryslicker
Posts: 112
Joined: Fri Oct 22, 2010 11:14 pm
Location: rural eastern Victoria Australia

Re: Words introduced by movies

Unread post by countryslicker » Wed Aug 29, 2012 4:48 pm

During my childhood growing up in Australia, "going to the flicks" was a common expression. The Saturday afternoon screenings in the local cinema were always referred to as "matinees", from which I guess comes "matinee idol". It would be interesting to know of any other regional differences in other English=speaking countries, perhaps even words in a foreign language.

The Zombies should definitely have their own thread :shock:

Richard Finegan
Posts: 1087
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2010 3:09 am

Re: Words introduced by movies

Unread post by Richard Finegan » Thu Aug 30, 2012 1:59 am

countryslicker wrote:
The Zombies should definitely have their own thread.
To quote the great Mantan Moreland in 1941:
"If there's one thing that I wouldn't want to be twice, zombies is both of 'em!"

earlytalkiebuffRob
Posts: 3428
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: Words introduced by movies

Unread post by earlytalkiebuffRob » Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:36 pm

Richard Finegan wrote:
countryslicker wrote:
The Zombies should definitely have their own thread.
To quote the great Mantan Moreland in 1941:
"If there's one thing that I wouldn't want to be twice, zombies is both of 'em!"
The 'Zombie' was also a cocktail. I read of one movie where the Ritz Brothers enter a bar and ask for three Zombies. The bartender says something along the lines of "I can see that. What are you drinking!"

User avatar
boblipton
Posts: 6280
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: Words introduced by movies

Unread post by boblipton » Wed Sep 21, 2016 3:42 pm

earlytalkiebuffRob wrote:
Richard Finegan wrote:
countryslicker wrote:
The Zombies should definitely have their own thread.
To quote the great Mantan Moreland in 1941:
"If there's one thing that I wouldn't want to be twice, zombies is both of 'em!"
The 'Zombie' was also a cocktail. I read of one movie where the Ritz Brothers enter a bar and ask for three Zombies. The bartender says something along the lines of "I can see that. What are you drinking!"
To quote Thomas Waller on the subject:

Last edited by silentfilm on Thu Sep 22, 2016 11:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Embedded YouTube link
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

Post Reply